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  Homelessness and Poverty Issues

The training period for the Take 10 Volunteers includes a thorough introduction to important humanitarian issues and causes. One of them deals with homelessness and poverty – a severe and relevant problem which we need to be well aware of.

 

According to the official European statistics 1 808 550 people across Europe have been homeless at least once since 1995. Germany and the UK are leading the charts with the most homeless people for that period.

Being Well Informed

We often take our privileges of having a permanent home, a roof under our heads, and a steady income for granted. We tend to underappreciate what we have until we meet the hard-hitting facts of the real world.

Millions of people would give everything to trade their actual problems with our minor everyday struggles. Here, at Take 10, we believe it is of great importance to be well informed about the situation in the real world and the struggle some people have to go through daily.

A structured gap year can be just what you need.

Being a volunteer at Take 10 ensures that you will investigate the homelessness and poverty issues up-close. You will get familiar with the conditions of the poor throughout history as well as the situation in modern days. Furthermore, you will share insights with your team and discuss how it will affect the actions of Humana People to People.

This is exactly what our volunteers from the May team experienced last week. They investigated the conditions of the poor in Denmark, the power of the community, the present and future scenarios around the issues, and many more topics with action activities and field trips. One of the volunteers – Franziska described the process very well in her blog. Read her impression and check out how a day of a field trip about meeting the homeless goes.

Meeting The Poor

The plan for the day is to meet the poor in the local area. It is essentially about people and their stories. It includes long conversations with people who are homeless, on benefits, pensioners as well as visits of food banks and homeless shelters.

Have you ever tried to imagine how life on the street is like? What would it feel like to depend on the help of others? Would you share your story with others or would you be ashamed and embarrassed to talk about it?

The day begins early – at 6.30 the volunteers meet in the kitchen and prepare sandwiches for the homeless. Departure is at 8 – the volunteers go towards Copenhagen to meet the homeless up-close, learn about their stories, and see what kind of help they usually get. The volunteers spent a big part of the day with the homeless in order to understand their situation and how their typical day goes as better as possible.

We have all seen homeless people on the streets but looking “behind the scenes” and coming face to face with the situation is a completely different story. The volunteers this year had prepared a list of things that they wanted to learn about:

;
  • Where do the homeless come from and how long have they been in this situation
  • Age/sex ratio
  • Their story, interests, wishes, future expectations, and political views
  • Where they do they get help from and is it beneficial
  • Where do they spend the nights
  • Do they have sources of income and food
  • How do people usually treat them
  • How do they handle hygiene issues

Arriving in Copenhagen the volunteers meet a worker at ‘Food to Homeless’. They accompany and help the worker with sandwiches and fruits, hot chocolate, coffee and tea on the streets. The volunteers also get involved with other activities – for example, the May team helped with setting up the second-hand store ‘Hjerte til Hjerte’ (Heart to Heart) which the “Food to Homeless” work with.

What follows is a tour of the streets where volunteers look for homeless people and spend time talking to them, offering food, and learning about their stories and experiences.

This is what the May volunteers learned by talking to the homeless around Copenhagen

Most homeless people are immigrants with the majority being men (not many children they met, but they heard there are some living on the street). The reasons for being homeless can be various but the most common one is some type of mental illness or a drug/alcohol abuse.

The major economic difficulties for the homeless include the lack of sustainable accommodation. Furthermore, not everyone has the knowledge and possibility to apply for relevant documentation which the law requires.

An example of how the situation of homeless people can get drastically more difficult is the new Danish Government law on the matter. According to it, homeless people are not allowed to gather in large groups. For them this means sleeping alone which presents huge trouble – many people get robbed or even attacked. Our May volunteers heard shocking stories of people being set on fire while sleeping.

The problem is people tend to put all homeless people in the same box. The above-mentioned law was introduced because a large group of foreigners started a practice of arriving at the country and robbing people at festivals. However, the security measures which the Government has taken affected over 6000 homeless people who just wanted to find security and support.

Every person has a different story which we are not aware of until we talk to them. Homeless people are not criminals they just less lucky then most of us are and they are trying to find a way to survive.

Depending on the kindness and sympathy of others does not mean you always get the support you need. During tourist seasons, Christmas, and holidays people show their generous and understanding side and tend to be more open towards helping people in need. However, during the rest of the time the situation is completely different – homeless people shared that January and February are usually the hardest months to go through. And the harsh reality is that most of the poor heavily rely on the donations of strangers.

The good news is there are lots of organizations who try to do their share in making a difference. ‘Hus Forbi’ is a good example. They are selling newspapers to homeless people for 10 danish crowns, which they then resell for 20 crowns. The company also provides workers with clothing for the summer and winter.

The common misconception that the homeless are dangerous or drug/alcohol addicts is seriously getting on the way of our society. In fact, most of the homeless people rarely use drugs or alcohol extensively. They do not want to destroy their lives, they just need help to get back on their feet – most people want to receive a chance to get a steady job more than anything else.

What will you get out of such an experience?

Walking around the streets of a city and spending the entire day learning about the struggles of the homeless might be exhausting. However, it is undeniable that using your energy for doing something good and understanding a relevant issue is way better than ignorance.

One of the most important things we need to learn and understand is that there are poor people everywhere in the world. Developed or not so much, all countries have groups of poor people and this is unavoidable. However, what we can do is be concerned, show empathy and help with what we can.

The Take 10 Volunteers learn about the differences and similarities amongst this type of people. They understand what those people need and how they can help. Furthermore, they can combine what they learn during their preparation period and during their project period in Malawi, Mozambique, Zambia or India. And this is only the beginning of the new knowledge which they can use to make a difference and inspire change.

A structured gap year can be just what you need.

Empathy is the starting point for creating a community and taking action.  It’s the impetus of creating change.

Max Carver

The number of homeless people in Denmark is sadly increasing each year

Check out Franziska’s blog for valuable insights on important topics and the everyday life of a volunteer at Take 10

The Take 10 Volunteers combine learning with action for better understanding the issues they need to tackle.

Hus Forbi is one of the Danish organizations which aim to support the homeless. Keep reading to learn more about what they do.

Contrary to the popular belief most homeless people are not addicts or bad people. In fact, the majority would appreciate a chance for a stable job more than anything else.

The Take 10 Volunteer Programme

The Take 10 Volunteer Programme is fast-paced and action-based with the aim to prepare, educate, and train volunteers. They spend three months at a learning centre in Europe learning from top educators and participating in field trips and other activities. After this training volunteers travel to projects in Malawi, Mozambique, Zambia or India. There, they work shoulder to shoulder with the local activists and community for six months, in order to to create positive change. One month of conclusion and reflection back in Europe marks the end of the programme.

The 10-month programme provides an opportunity for people to learn from, and volunteer with, community-driven projects under the Humana People to People umbrella. The projects promote development within the spheres of education, sustainable farming, child aid and mitigation of climate change.

Fighting Injustice with Active Tolerance

What is the difference between tolerance and indulgence and how is it pivotal for modern society? What can we do to become active bystanders and oppose injustice?

#EndPoverty #Together

Poverty cannot be overcome by charity. It has to be resolved by changing an unjust system from the bottom up. Solidarity action from the international community and from individuals are also needed.

Empowering Rural Women

Rural women in Africa & Asia work just as hard as their male counterparts to secure their families’ livelihoods. Women contribute with their labour and knowledge on family farms – and they are good at it.

Homelessness in Denmark

The training period for the Take 10 Volunteers includes a thorough introduction to important humanitarian issues and causes. One of them deals with homelessness and poverty – a severe and relevant problem which we need to be well aware of.

 

A structured gap year can be just what you need.

According to the official European statistics 1 808 550 people across Europe have been homeless at least once since 1995. Germany and the UK are leading the charts with the most homeless people for that period.

 

A structured gap year spent teaching English is a wonderful experience.

The number of homeless people in Denmark is sadly increasing each year

Being Well Informed

We often take our privileges of having a permanent home, a roof under our heads, and a steady income for granted. We tend to underappreciate what we have until we meet the hard-hitting facts of the real world.

Millions of people would give everything to trade their actual problems with our minor everyday struggles. Here, at Take 10, we believe it is of great importance to be well informed about the situation in the real world and the struggle some people have to go through daily.

A structured gap year can be just what you need.

Being a volunteer at Take 10 ensures that you will investigate the homelessness and poverty issues up-close. You will get familiar with the conditions of the poor throughout history as well as the situation in modern days. Furthermore, you will share insights with your team and discuss how it will affect the actions of Humana People to People.

This is exactly what our volunteers from the May team experienced last week. They investigated the conditions of the poor in Denmark, the power of the community, the present and future scenarios around the issues, and many more topics with action activities and field trips. One of the volunteers – Franziska described the process very well in her blog. Read her impression and check out how a day of a field trip about meeting the homeless goes.

A structured gap year spent teaching English is a wonderful experience.

Check out Franziska’s blog for valuable insights on important topics and the everyday life of a volunteer at Take 10

Meeting The Poor

The plan for the day is to meet the poor in the local area. It is essentially about people and their stories. It includes long conversations with people who are homeless, on benefits, pensioners as well as visits of food banks and homeless shelters.

Have you ever tried to imagine how life on the street is like? What would it feel like to depend on the help of others? Would you share your story with others or would you be ashamed and embarrassed to talk about it?

A structured gap year spent teaching English is a wonderful experience.

The majority of the homeless people heavily rely on the kindness of people who give them money or food/drinks

The day begins early – at 6.30 the volunteers meet in the kitchen and prepare sandwiches for the homeless. Departure is at 8 – the volunteers go towards Copenhagen to meet the homeless up-close, learn about their stories, and see what kind of help they usually get. The volunteers spent a big part of the day with the homeless in order to understand their situation and how their typical day goes as better as possible.

We have all seen homeless people on the streets but looking “behind the scenes” and coming face to face with the situation is a completely different story. The volunteers this year had prepared a list of things that they wanted to learn about:

;
  • Where do the homeless come from and how long have they been in this situation
  • Age/sex ratio
  • Their story, interests, wishes, future expectations, and political views
  • Where they do they get help from and is it beneficial
  • Where do they spend the nights
  • Do they have sources of income and food
  • How do people usually treat them
  • How do they handle hygiene issues

Arriving in Copenhagen the volunteers meet a worker at ‘Food to Homeless’. They accompany and help the worker with sandwiches and fruits, hot chocolate, coffee and tea on the streets. The volunteers also get involved with other activities – for example, the May team helped with setting up the second-hand store ‘Hjerte til Hjerte’ (Heart to Heart) which the “Food to Homeless” work with.

What follows is a tour of the streets where volunteers look for homeless people and spend time talking to them, offering food, and learning about their stories and experiences.

A structured gap year spent teaching English is a wonderful experience.

The Take 10 Volunteers combine learning with action for better understanding the issues they need to tackle.

This is what the May volunteers learned by talking to the homeless around Copenhagen

Most homeless people are immigrants with the majority being men (not many children they met, but they heard there are some living on the street). The reasons for being homeless can be various but the most common one is some type of mental illness or a drug/alcohol abuse.

The major economic difficulties for the homeless include the lack of sustainable accommodation. Furthermore, not everyone has the knowledge and possibility to apply for relevant documentation which the law requires.

A structured gap year as a volunteer can start of your humanitarian career.

Hus Forbi is one of the Danish organizations which aim to support the homeless. Keep reading to learn more about what they do.

An example of how the situation of homeless people can get drastically more difficult is the new Danish Government law on the matter. According to it, homeless people are not allowed to gather in large groups. For them this means sleeping alone which presents huge trouble – many people get robbed or even attacked. Our May volunteers heard shocking stories of people being set on fire while sleeping.

The problem is people tend to put all homeless people in the same box. The above-mentioned law was introduced because a large group of foreigners started a practice of arriving at the country and robbing people at festivals. However, the security measures which the Government has taken affected over 6000 homeless people who just wanted to find security and support.

A structured gap year as a volunteer can start of your humanitarian career.

Living on the streets can be extremely dangerous. Especially when you are all alone.

Period One of the Take 10 Volunteer Project

Volunteer training is truly essential. Therefore, our volunteers spend three months at one of our learning centers getting prepared appropriately about what they will have to work with during the second period of the programme – the project work in Africa or India. The preparation includes studying relevant subjects as well as practical projects. The field trip about meeting the homeless as part of the practical action our May team had to engage with.

Every person has a different story which we are not aware of until we talk to them. Homeless people are not criminals they just less lucky then most of us are and they are trying to find a way to survive.

Depending on the kindness and sympathy of others does not mean you always get the support you need. During tourist seasons, Christmas, and holidays people show their generous and understanding side and tend to be more open towards helping people in need. However, during the rest of the time the situation is completely different – homeless people shared that January and February are usually the hardest months to go through. And the harsh reality is that most of the poor heavily rely on the donations of strangers.

The good news is there are lots of organizations who try to do their share in making a difference. ‘Hus Forbi’ is a good example. They are selling newspapers to homeless people for 10 danish crowns, which they then resell for 20 crowns. The company also provides workers with clothing for the summer and winter.

A structured gap year can be just what you need.

The common misconception that the homeless are dangerous or drug/alcohol addicts is seriously getting on the way of our society. In fact, most of the homeless people rarely use drugs or alcohol extensively. They do not want to destroy their lives, they just need help to get back on their feet – most people want to receive a chance to get a steady job more than anything else.

What will you get out of such an experience?

Walking around the streets of a city and spending the entire day learning about the struggles of the homeless might be exhausting. However, it is undeniable that using your energy for doing something good and understanding a relevant issue is way better than ignorance.

One of the most important things we need to learn and understand is that there are poor people everywhere in the world. Developed or not so much, all countries have groups of poor people and this is unavoidable. However, what we can do is be concerned, show empathy and help with what we can.

Empathy is the starting point for creating a community and taking action.  It’s the impetus of creating change.

Max Carver

The Take 10 Volunteers learn about the differences and similarities amongst this type of people. They understand what those people need and how they can help. Furthermore, they can combine what they learn during their preparation period and during their project period in Malawi, Mozambique, Zambia or India. And this is only the beginning of the new knowledge which they can use to make a difference and inspire change.

The Take 10 Volunteer Programme

The Take 10 Volunteer Programme is fast-paced and action-based with the aim to prepare, educate, and train volunteers. They spend three months at a learning centre in Europe learning from top educators and participating in field trips and other activities. After this training volunteers travel to projects in Malawi, Mozambique, Zambia or India. There, they work shoulder to shoulder with the local activists and community for six months, in order to to create positive change. One month of conclusion and reflection back in Europe marks the end of the programme.

The 10-month programme provides an opportunity for people to learn from, and volunteer with, community-driven projects under the Humana People to People umbrella. The projects promote development within the spheres of education, sustainable farming, child aid and mitigation of climate change.