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 Do you have a toilet at home?

Having a well-functioning toilet a few steps away from your cosy room or office is a great feeling, isn’t it? Strangely enough, we rarely think and talk about the comfort of having a toilet we can easily use whenever we want, about the pressing issue of no accessible sanitation for many regions. 

Is having a toilet a privilege?

We often ignore the facts but the harsh reality is that many people around the world do not have access to sanitation (half of the population if we have to be exact). This is why goal number six in the Sustainable Development Goals 2030 is providing water and sanitation for everyone.

The situation is drastically different in various places around the world. Ranging from having to go outside your home to find a toilet, having to travel kilometres until you reach one, or being forced to use a toilet without water supply – things can get serious.

This affects not only the comfort of everyday life but also the well-being of people. Not having clean water supply and good sanitation is a prerequisite to spreading diseases and reducing the quality of living conditions.

The website of World Toilet Day does a great job in displaying the seriousness of the issue and the privilege a lot of us take for granted.

Here are 7 of the most unexpected toilets that actually exist

Urine Diversion Dry Toilet

Urine Diversion Dry Toilet

This type of toilet operates without water and has a divider so that urine and faeces are divert It is easy to maintain and has a lot of advantages like:

Saving dozens of litres of water each day
No problems with clogging or unbearable odours
Easy (and cheap) to build and maintain regardless of living conditions

These types of toilets are popular in rural areas of Malawi and are making living conditions considerably better.

See Thru Loo

The See-Thru Loo

This toilet appeared outside the Tate Britain Museum in London in 2003. The concept was developed by Monica Bonvicini, she called it “Don’t miss a sec” since people using the toilet were able to see through the walls and observe the outside world.

Even tho the opposite was not possible and no one could see the people inside most people didn’t appreciate the idea and decided to use a normal toilet instead.

Japanese toilets

The toilets of the future

Japan is often referred to as the land of the future and this doesn’t exclude their toilets. Some high-tech water closets in the country have more buttons than your washing machine and can perform various functions including washing you, drying you, playing music or different sounds to make you more comfortable, flushing themselves, and automatically putting the seat down.

Some go as far as getting connected to apps to keep track of your toilet activities, analyse your produce and let you know if you need to see a doctor. 

The balancing act toilet

The Balancing Act

There are other types of interesting toilets in Japan including the one nicknamed “the balancing act”. One thing this type of toilet contributes to is exercising your legs.

Portable toilet

Portable toilets do exist – they are shaped like a box and can be carried around easily. Used in households but more often for hiking, camping, or avoiding the scary festival toilets.

Festival Toilets

Festival Toilets

Those who have had the pleasure of attending a festival would have also come face to face with the not so pretty reality of festival toilets. They are definitely a sight to see and something to avoid if possible.

Bushes for toilets

Bushes and other open spaces

For more thwn two billion people, the only option is to use bushes, street gutters, fields, water streams or other open spaces as as a toilet. No running water, comfortable (or not so comfortable) toilet seat to position yourself at, no way to completely hide from the passers-by.

According to Global Goal 6: Clean Water and Sanitation, the practice of open defecation should be ended by 2030.

By 2030, the goal is to achieve access to adequate and equitable sanitation and hygiene for all and end open defecation. Special attention should be paid to the needs of women and girls and those in vulnerable situations.

WorldToilet Day: Join the revolootion!

Key Facts About Sanitation

4.2 billion people (half of the population) live without safely managed sanitation

673 million people practice open defecation

Inadequate sanitation is estimate to be a reason for around 432 000 deaths each year

One third of all primary schools lack basic sanitation and hygiene services

For every 1$ invested in sanitation in rural areas 2,5$ are saved from medical bills and healthcare expenses

The Toilet Pirivilege Game

The Privilege Game

Play the toilet and sanitation privilege game and see how much access to clean water and sanitation is affecting your life in reality.

Improving sanitation is one an important job you can get involved with as an international volunteer.

Schools need new latrines, existing facilities need to have tippy-taps so hands can be washed and so on.

Toilet Day Pin

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Are toilets a privilege?

Having a well-functioning toilet a few steps away from your cozy room or office is a great feeling, isn’t it? Strangely enough, we rarely think and talk about the comfort of having a toilet we can easily use whenever we want, about the pressing issue of no accessible sanitation for many regions.

World Toilet Day

Having a toilet is a privilege?

We often ignore the facts but the harsh reality is that many people around the world do not have access to sanitation (half of the population if we have to be exact). This is why goal number six in the Sustainable Development Goals 2030 is providing water and sanitation for everyone.

The situation is drastically different in various places around the world. Ranging from having to go outside your home to find a toilet, having to travel kilometers until you reach one, or being forced to use a toilet without water supply – things can get serious.

This affects not only the comfort of everyday life but also the well-being of people. Not having clean water supply and good sanitation is a prerequisite to spreading diseases and reducing the quality of living conditions.

The website of World Toilet Day does a great job in displaying the seriousness of the issue and the privilege a lot of us take for granted.

 

7 of the most unexpected toilets that actually exist

Urine Diversion Dry Toilet

Urine Diversion Dry Toilet

This type of toilet operates without water and has a divider so that urine and feces are diverted. It is easy to maintain and has a lot of advantages like:
Saving dozens of liters of water each day
No problems with clogging or unbearable odors
Easy (and cheap) to build and maintain regardless of living conditions

These types of toilets are popular in rural areas of Malawi and are making living conditions considerably better.

See Thru Loo

The See-Thru Loo

This toilet appeared outside the Tate Britain Museum in London in 2003. The concept was developed by Monica Bonvicini, she called it “Don’t miss a sec” since people using the toilet were able to see through the walls and observe the outside world.
Even tho the opposite was not possible and no one could see the people inside most people didn’t appreciate the idea and decided to use a normal toilet instead.

 

Japanese toilets

The toilets of the future

Japan is often referred to as the land of the future and this doesn’t exclude their toilets. Some high-tech water closets in the country have more buttons than your washing machine and can perform various functions including washing you, drying you, playing music or different sounds to make you more comfortable, flushing themselves, and automatically putting the seat down.
Some go as far as getting connected to apps to keep track of your toilet activities and show if they are available or not.

 

The balancing act toilet

The Balancing Act

There are other types of interesting toilets in Japan including the one nicknamed “the balancing act”. One thing this type of toilet contributes to is exercising your legs.

 

Portable Toilet

Portable toilet

Portable toilets do exist – they are shaped like a box and can be carried around easily. Used in households but more often for hiking, camping, or avoiding the scary festival toilets.

 

 

Festival Toilets

Festival Toilets

Those who have had the pleasure of attending a festival would have also come face to face with the not so pretty reality of festival toilets. They are definitely a sight to see and something to avoid if possible.

 

 

Bushes for toilets

Bushes

For some people, the only option is to use the bushes as a toilet. No running water, comfortable (or not so comfortable) toilet seat to position yourself at, no way to completely hide from the passersby.
We resort to this type of toilet in dire times but the truth is using bushes as a toilet is a way to spread potential diseases and it should be avoided at all costs.

 

 

Key Facts about Sanitation and Toilets

4.2 billion people (half of the population) live without safely managed sanitation

673 million people practice open defecation

Inadequate sanitation is estimate to be a reason for around 432 000 deaths each year

One third of all primary schools lack basic sanitation and hygiene services

For every 1$ invested in sanitation in rural areas 2,5$ are saved from medical bills and healthcare expenses

Toilet Privilege Game

The Toilet Privilege Game

Play the toilet and sanitation privilege game and see how much access to clean water and sanitation is affecting your life in reality.