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   Reasons to go volunteering abroad

People can have varying reasons for volunteering. The positive effects in both personal and professional aspects are undeniable and attract all kinds of people. Age, gender, or race are not things that matter when it comes to volunteering.

Here are the five most common types of volunteer enthusiasts:

Type 1: Got a degree but no experience 

These types of volunteers have successfully obtained a university/college degree but they lack the experience.

Volunteering for them comes as a way to test the real working environment and put theory into practice. Teamwork, communication, cooperation, management and the relevant skills needed in their field of work are tested and improved greatly.

 

Type 2: Too young to commit to higher education

Jumping straight into higher education after finishing high school can be a scary thing to do. And for a reason – not many people are crystal clear about what they want to do for the rest of their lives.

A lot of people make the right choice to take things slow, take a gap year, and reflect on themselves, their wishes, and possible future.

Volunteering gives them the option to explore various fields of work, get to know themselves better, learn new, relevant skills, and explore possibilities for future development.

 

Type 3: Looking for a new challenge

These types of volunteers usually have a degree or a career of some kind but are looking for a new challenge and a positive change in their lives.

They embark on the volunteer adventure to gain a refreshing burst of energy, share their hard-earned experience, and learn from others in the process.

 

Type 4: Cannot stand the rat-race

Some people have gone through everything – they got the education, found a job, found their partner, “figured out their life” and finally got to ask the fateful question – “is that it?”

Getting stuck in the rat-race and being forced to relive the same day over and over again can be exhausting. Therefore, some of the people in this situation take a mid-career break and turn to volunteering as a refreshing new page of their lives. They press the PAUSE button and take some time to explore another side of life while getting to know themselves again, re-assessing their life, and making it exciting again.

 

Type 5: Backpackers looking for purposeful travelling

Some volunteers share that they have been travelling for a while and they can no longer ignore the realities they have witnessed.

They are aware of the many problems in the world and they are ready to do something about them. Combing their passion for travelling with a long-term volunteer project can bring them both satisfaction and the possibility to do something about the problems they encounter.

 

Do you fit into one of these categories? Or are you a completely different type of volunteer?

We would love to hear from you and learn more about your reasons for volunteering.

Talk to us!

Why should you volunteer
What kind of certifications do I get?

Can I get an internship?

It is possible. It all depends on your skills and how well they fit the needs of the organization. Also, it depends on the current need the organization has – if your skills match with their requirements and needs you can land an internship.

Can I get a valid reference?

Yes, you can get a valid reference.

What skills can I develop as an International Development Volunteer?

Through the different periods and elements of the programme you have the possibility to develop the following skills:

  • Written & Verbal Communication
  • Interpersonal Skills
  • Leadership
  • Self-Reflection
  • Confidence
  • Public Speaking
  • Decision Making
  • Investigative Research
  • Proactive Problem Solving
  • Project Management

Travel tips for volunteers

"The Dos"

Do be respectful towards the people you meet.

Do learn greetings and polite phrases in the local language.

Do get the permission of parents to take photos of children.

Do listen to what needs and wishes are expressed by the people you meet.

Do listen to local experts.

Do dress appropriately and respect local culture.

Do taste the local food, even if it is termites.

"The Don'ts"

Don’t volunteer for a short time in an orphanage. Children need stable, long-term relationships with carers, not random volunteers who come and go.

Don’t pose with children to make “cute” social media posts

Don’t impose your own well-intentioned “good ideas” in communities who didn’t ask for them.

Don’t assume you know better by default. Investigate.

Don’t walk around in a skimpy shorts just because the sun is out.

Don’t smoke cigarettes in public unless everyone else does.

Don’t plant trees in the dry season.

There are 1000 reasons for volunteering abroad.
How can I join the Take 10 Volunteer programme?

In order to enrol, you need to meet the following requirements:

    • You are 18 years old or older.
    • You are ready to leave your home for 10 months to volunteer in a community environment 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
    • You have decided not to drink alcohol or take drugs for the entirety of the program.
    • You are eager to experience a multidisciplinary and collective training programme, which includes theoretical and practical activities.
    • You are ready to immerse yourself in a multicultural and diverse community.
    • You are ready to volunteer where you are most needed.
    • You look forward to engaging with the Humana People to People projects in a spirit of cooperation, mutual learning and respect.
    • You are committed to learn about people, cultures, values and traditions, and to share your knowledge and stories with the public after your travels.

Is a gap year the right choice?

Taking a gap year before diving into higher education has many benefits for your future personal and professional development. Here are some of them.

Skills, Experience, Qualifications

Looking for a way to practice what you have learned and take your first steps in the humanitarian sector?
There are many ways to get hands-on experience and acquire the qualifications you need for a good start. Check our resources to get some inspiration and useful information.

Is it worth taking a year out?

What can you do to make a gap year absolutely worth it? There are lots of options and you can get a lot out of it as long as you have a good structure.

Why volunteer

People can have varying reasons for volunteering. The positive effects in both personal and professional aspects are undeniable and attract all kinds of people. Age, gender, or race are not things that matter when it comes to volunteering.

Here are the five most common types of volunteer enthusiasts:

Type 1: Got a degree but no experience

These types of volunteers have successfully obtained a university/college degree but they lack the experience.

Volunteering for them comes as a way to test the real working environment and put theory into practice. Teamwork, communication, cooperation, management and the relevant skills needed in their field of work are tested and improved greatly.

 

Community development projects

Type 2: Too young to commit to higher education

Jumping straight into higher education after finishing high school can be a scary thing to do. And for a reason – not many people are crystal clear about what they want to do for the rest of their lives.

A lot of people make the right choice to take things slow, take a gap year, and reflect on themselves, their wishes, and possible future.

Volunteering gives them the option to explore various fields of work, get to know themselves better, learn new, relevant skills, and explore possibilities for future development.

 

Corinne from Italy

Type 3: Looking for a new challenge

These types of volunteers usually have a degree or a career of some kind but are looking for a new challenge and a positive change in their lives.

They embark on the volunteer adventure to gain a refreshing burst of energy, share their hard-earned experience, and learn from others in the process.

 

January Team

Type 4: Cannot stand the rat-race

Some people have gone through everything – they got the education, found a job, found their partner, “figured out their life” and finally got to ask the fateful question – “is that it?”

Getting stuck in the rat-race and being forced to relive the same day over and over again can be exhausting. Therefore, some of the people in this situation take a mid-career break and turn to volunteering as a refreshing new page of their lives. They press the PAUSE button and take some time to explore another side of life while getting to know themselves again, re-assessing their life, and making it exciting again.

 

Getting out of the hamster wheel to volunteer abroad.

So, they press the PAUSE button and take some time to reflect and to re-assess their life situation before deciding on which path to take.

Type 5: Backpackers looking for purposeful travelling

Some volunteers share that they have been travelling for a while and they can no longer ignore the realities they have witnessed.

They are aware of the many problems in the world and they are ready to do something about them. Combing their passion for travelling with a long-term volunteer project can bring them both satisfaction and the possibility to do something about the problems they encounter.

 

Getting out of the hamster wheel to volunteer abroad.

Do you fit into one of these categories? Or are you a completely different type of volunteer?

We would love to hear from you and learn more about your reasons for volunteering.

Talk to us!

Want to know more about volunteering abroad?

 

Let’s stay in touch! 🙂

Travel tips for volunteers

"The Dos"

Do be respectful towards the people you meet.

Do learn greetings and polite phrases in the local language.

Do get the permission of parents to take photos of children.

Do listen to what needs and wishes are expressed by the people you meet.

Do listen to local experts.

Do dress appropriately and respect local culture.

Do taste the local food, even if it is termites.

"The Don'ts"

Don’t volunteer for a short time in an orphanage. Children need stable, long-term relationships with carers, not random volunteers who come and go.

Don’t pose with children to make “cute” social media posts

Don’t impose your own well-intentioned “good ideas” in communities who didn’t ask for them.

Don’t assume you know better by default. Investigate.

Don’t walk around in a skimpy shorts just because the sun is out.

Don’t smoke cigarettes in public unless everyone else does.

Don’t plant trees in the dry season.

Volunteering abroad can change your life and add valuable experience.
What kind of certifications do I get?

Can I get an internship?

It is possible. It all depends on your skills and how well they fit the needs of the organization. Also, it depends on the current need the organization has – if your skills match with their requirements and needs you can land an internship.

Can I get a valid reference?

Yes, you can get a valid reference.

What skills can I develop as an International Development Volunteer?

Through the different periods and elements of the programme you have the possibility to develop the following skills:

  • Written & Verbal Communication
  • Interpersonal Skills
  • Leadership
  • Self-Reflection
  • Confidence
  • Public Speaking
  • Decision Making
  • Investigative Research
  • Proactive Problem Solving
  • Project Management