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 Participation & People

Democracy is built on inclusion, equal treatment and participation — and it is a fundamental building block for peace, sustainable development and human rights. Therefore, the United Nations have decided that the theme for Democracy Day in 2019 is “Participation”.

Universal values

The 15th of September was chosen as the international day of democracy back in 2007 by the United Nations General Assembly. The goal was to promote the principles and true meaning of democracy.

By definition, democracy is “a government in which the supreme power is vested in the people and exercised by them directly or indirectly through a system of representation usually involving periodically held free elections”.

During the above-mentioned United Nations meeting it was also concluded that while democracies share common features a single universal model does not exist. However, democracy stands on the universal value of freely-expressed will of people and their participation in all aspects of life and decision making.

 

It’s all about people

2019’s Day of Democracy is another opportunity to remember that democracy is all about people. It is built on inclusion, fair treatment, and participation.

Democracy’s roots can be traced back to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and more specifically the line stating that “the will of the people shall be the basis of the authority of government”. The fundamentals of democracy’s values rest on that statement and have inspired constitution-making around the world.

Democracy at its core relies on a constant dialogue between the society and the political class. And most importantly it relies on the impact that this dialog will have on the governance.

Unfortunately, today we are witnessing a shrinking of civil space despite the progress of technology, access of people to information, and general globalisation. This year’s Day of Democracy is a perfect opportunity to urge governments to act on the matter and call for more participation of the society.

 

Democracy in education

The history of democratic education traces back to 1600 and is now both a goal and a method in the field.

School systems nowadays promotes equal rights amongst students and put their thoughts and concerns on the same level as teachers. This helps build a better environment and bring up an important aspect of the students’ human rights.

The democratic approach is of utmost importance in education. Allowing children to make collective decisions by expressing opinions and having an equal share in the process is essential. This teaches children that their opinions matter and they should be able to freely express their thoughts without feeling oppressed. In other words – it makes them understand part of their basic human rights.

 

How do we celebrate it?

The International Day of Democracy began as a way to remind people of the true nature of the term and the importance of freedom and inclusion of people. This remains the most important part of the celebration which we should never forget in the first place.

At Take 10 we practice the democratic approach of including everyone in the decision-making process and respecting the right of free will and expressing an opinion. This is fundamental for our values and the way our community life functions.

Another good opportunity is to visit your local parliament in case it is having an open doors day in regards to the holiday. Find out more about your parliament and representatives so you stay informed and well-aware of how you can exercise your rights of expressing an opinion on those matters.

Participation is Key

Introducing communication technology in classrooms in India to promote participation in civic society: One of Humana People to People India’s projects,

 

 

A structured gap year can be just what you need.
A structured gap year can be just what you need.
A structured gap year can be just what you need.

Democracy is built on inclusion, equal treatment and participation — and it is a fundamental building block for peace, sustainable development and human rights. Therefore, the United Nations have decided that the theme for Democracy Day in 2019 is “Participation”.

“Democracy is built on inclusion, equal treatment and participation.”

Universal values

The 15th of September was chosen as the international day of democracy back in 2007 by the United Nations General Assembly. The goal was to promote the principles and true meaning of democracy.

By definition, democracy is “a government in which the supreme power is vested in the people and exercised by them directly or indirectly through a system of representation usually involving periodically held free elections”.

During the above-mentioned United Nations meeting it was also concluded that while democracies share common features a single universal model does not exist. However, democracy stands on the universal value of freely-expressed will of people and their participation in all aspects of life and decision making.

Participation is Key

Introducing communication technology in classrooms in India to promote participation in civic society: One of Humana People to People India’s projects,

It’s all about people

2019’s Day of Democracy is another opportunity to remember that democracy is all about people. It is built on inclusion, fair treatment, and participation.

Democracy’s roots can be traced back to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and more specifically the line stating that “the will of the people shall be the basis of the authority of government”. The fundamentals of democracy’s values rest on that statement and have inspired constitution-making around the world.

A structured gap year can be just what you need.

Democracy at its core relies on a constant dialogue between the society and the political class. And most importantly it relies on the impact that this dialog will have on the governance.

Unfortunately, today we are witnessing a shrinking of civil space despite the progress of technology, access of people to information, and general globalisation. This year’s Day of Democracy is a perfect opportunity to urge governments to act on the matter and call for more participation of the society.

A structured gap year can be just what you need.

Democracy in education

The history of democratic education traces back to 1600 and is now both a goal and a method in the field.

School systems nowadays promotes equal rights amongst students and put their thoughts and concerns on the same level as teachers. This helps build a better environment and bring up an important aspect of the students’ human rights.

A structured gap year can be just what you need.

The democratic approach is of utmost importance in education. Allowing children to make collective decisions by expressing opinions and having an equal share in the process is essential. This teaches children that their opinions matter and they should be able to freely express their thoughts without feeling oppressed. In other words – it makes them understand part of their basic human rights.

Nitu

Nitu used to work in a textile factory where she would segregate pieces of fabric by colour. Today, she goes to a school, uses a ‘notepad’, and finds learning fun and innovative.Unfortunately, despite the laws prohibiting child labour in our country, lakhs of children are still found to be working in factories, construction sites, restaurants, and as domestic help.Humana People to People India is trying to change this reality. We identify such children and enrol them into a formal school or one of HPPI-run #Sambhavana schools, where their academic and social competencies are built up to their age-appropriate level.A small contribution goes a long way. You can support such children by supporting our #WeaveADream campaign which aims to raise money that will support the education of 100 child labourers to give them a chance to weave their own dreams.To donate, please click https://letzchange.org/projects/weaving-dreams-of-100-child-laborers-through-education?fbclid=IwAR0duxy7QyTl-0JWu-AoEsRqUTRQ-ZfyoZv2NehzeOKec_ilgf1eAiLNu0k

Gepostet von Humana People to People India am Freitag, 28. Juni 2019

How do we celebrate it?

The International Day of Democracy began as a way to remind people of the true nature of the term and the importance of freedom and inclusion of people. This remains the most important part of the celebration which we should never forget in the first place.

A structured gap year can be just what you need.

At Take 10 we practice the democratic approach of including everyone in the decision-making process and respecting the right of free will and expressing an opinion. This is fundamental for our values and the way our community life functions.

Another good opportunity is to visit your local parliament in case it is having an open doors day in regards to the holiday. Find out more about your parliament and representatives so you stay informed and well-aware of how you can exercise your rights of expressing an opinion on those matters.

A structured gap year can be just what you need.

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