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 Solidarity with

Mozambique

Despite being largely innocent of creating the climate crisis, Mozambique was severely punished by one of the most harsh climate catastrophe the world has ever seen: Cyclone Idai. It is a cruel world we live in, but we have the possibility to act – and you are hereby invited to do so.

 

The reality: Climate changed

Even though the continent of Africa is estimated to produce just 4% of global carbon emissions, it is the continent that pays the highest price: In many parts of Africa, the climate already changed. The cyclone Idai which has devastated central Mozambique is but the latest example.

For the millions of people in Mozambique, Malawi, Zimbabwe, Botswana and South Africa, climate change is not a future risk, it’s already a reality. Delayed or absent rainy seasons, erratic droughts, unexpected storms and not least unprecedented floods present a clear danger for families and communities in this part of the world. Access to water has become a privilege and the lack of water is threatening a city like Cape Town.

Extreme weather events have become numerous and left families without homes or livelihoods. For some children, the situation is hopeless and young people have no choice but to seek a future by migrating.

 

Planting trees is not enough

Planting trees to increase forest cover can be a good thing to do, but it will not prevent such disasters from happening in the future – or solve the issue of global warming, on its own. New coal mines and coal powered plants are being erected all over the African continent, from South Africa to Senegal, from Kenya to Mozambique, as well as in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Côte d’Ivoire. This is an issue that needs to be addressed.

Governments in Africa must do a better job of protecting their people, but fossil fuel companies must also be held accountable. For decades and decades, they have shamelessly exploited impoverished or war-torn African states for oil, coal and gas.

African populations and international communities must step up efforts against environmental degradation and greenhouse gas emissions. One way to do this is by decentralising energy supply systems, and by promoting tax policies that favour solar and wind energy investments.

 

Mitigating climate change on the grassroots level

While millions of school children and other good people push for decisive political action to stop emissions and to save the planet as we know it, there is a need to do something at the grassroots level – at the same time. There’s no time to lose and therefore Take 10 Volunteers go to work at long-term, community based people empowerment projects under the Humana People to People umbrella.

Humana People to People have worked to combat climate change and to mitigate its effect for more than twenty years, also in Mozambique.

 

Humana People to People’s two main approaches climate change are:

  • Adaptation, which seeks to adapt to changing environmental conditions;
  • Mitigation, which refers to addressing the root cause of climate change by reducing CO2 emissions.

 

Fighting climate change in Mozambique

To contribute to the efforts in fighting climate change and mitigating its negative effects to local communities, ADPP Mozambique (a member of Humana People to People) has engaged itself in several projects related to the development and dissemination of renewable energy sources.

The objective of these projects is to provide rural communities with access to alternative types of energy, such as solar energy, biogas and biofuel. Another activity is to promote the use of energy-saving devices, such as firewood-saving stoves, and to encourage related small-scale business.

 

How can you support the rebuilding of Mozambique?

A team of Take 10 Volunteers start their preparation period 1 May 2019.  After three months of intensive training, they go to Mozambique on 1 August 2019, for six months of project work, where they will help rebuild Mozambique together with the local project leadership.

At this moment in time, we do not know exactly which projects they will join, but it could be Childrens’ Towns, micro-grid projects (to install solar panels in rural communities) or Farmers’ Clubs – or other projects, according to the needs and depending on your level of Portuguese.

Please contact us for further information! info@take10volunteer.org

Extreme weather events have become more numerous and left families without homes or livelihoods.

Do you want to help rebuild

Mozambique?

Preparation course starts

May 1 2019

 Solidarity with

Mozambique

Despite being largely innocent of creating the climate crisis, Mozambique was severely punished by one of the most harsh climate catastrophe the world has ever seen: Cyclone Idai. It is a cruel world we live in, but we have the possibility to act – and you are hereby invited to do so.

 

The reality: Climate changed

Even though the continent of Africa is estimated to produce just 4% of global carbon emissions, it is the continent that pays the highest price: In many parts of Africa, the climate already changed. The cyclone Idai which has devastated central Mozambique is but the latest example.

 

For the millions of people in Mozambique, Malawi, Zimbabwe, Botswana and South Africa, climate change is not a future risk, it’s already a reality. Delayed or absent rainy seasons, erratic droughts, unexpected storms and not least unprecedented floods present a clear danger for families and communities in this part of the world. Access to water has become a privilege and the lack of water is threatening a city like Cape Town.

Extreme weather events have become numerous and left families without homes or livelihoods. For some children, the situation is hopeless and young people have no choice but to seek a future by migrating.

 

Extreme weather events have become more numerous and left families without homes or livelihoods.

Tree planting is not enough

Planting trees to increase forest cover can be a good thing to do, but it will not prevent such disasters from happening in the future – or solve the issue of global warming, on its own. New coal mines and coal powered plants are being erected all over the African continent, from South Africa to Senegal, from Kenya to Mozambique, as well as in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Côte d’Ivoire. This is an issue that needs to be addressed.

Governments in Africa must do a better job of protecting their people, but fossil fuel companies must also be held accountable. For decades and decades, they have shamelessly exploited impoverished or war-torn African states for oil, coal and gas.

African populations and international communities must step up efforts against environmental degradation and greenhouse gas emissions.  One way to do this is by decentralising energy supply systems, and by promoting tax policies that favour solar and wind energy investments.

 

Mitigating climate change on the grassroots level

While millions of school children and other good people push for decisive political action to stop emissions and to save the planet as we know it, there is a need to do something at the grassroots level – at the same time. There’s no time to lose and therefore Take 10 Volunteers go to work at long-term, community-based people empowerment projects under the Humana People to People umbrella.

Humana People to People have worked to combat climate change and to mitigate its effect for more than twenty years, also in Mozambique.

 

Humana People to People’s two main approaches climate change are:

  • Adaptation, which seeks to adapt to changing environmental conditions;
  • Mitigation, which refers to addressing the root cause of climate change by reducing CO2 emissions.

Fighting climate change in Mozambique

To contribute to the efforts in fighting climate change and mitigating its negative effects to local communities, ADPP Mozambique (a member of Humana People to People) has engaged itself in several projects related to the development and dissemination of renewable energy sources.

The objective of these projects is to provide rural communities with access to alternative types of energy, such as solar energy, biogas and biofuel. Another activity is to promote the use of energy-saving devices, such as firewood-saving stoves, and to encourage related small-scale business.

How you can support the rebuilding of Mozambique?

A team of Take 10 Volunteers start their preparation period 1 May 2019.  After three months of intensive training, they go to Mozambique on 1 August 2019, for six months of project work, where they will help rebuild Mozambique together with the local project leadership.

At this moment in time, we do not know exactly which projects they will join, but it could be Childrens’ Towns, micro-grid projects (to install solar panels in rural communities) or Farmers’ Clubs – or other projects, according to the needs and depending on your level of Portuguese.

Please contact us for further information! info@take10volunteer.org 

Do you want to help rebuild

Mozambique?

Preparation course starts

May 1 2019

Volunteer in Mozambique 2019

Teacher Training College in Nhamatanda

During the deadly cyclone Idai, students and teachers narrowly escaped the rising flood waters at the ADPP Teacher Training College in Nhamatanda in the Sofala Province of Mozambique. All students and teachers managed to make their way to neighbouring village of Lamego. Food is scarce there, and people are in danger of starvation.

This photo is taken just after the waters receded. Two metres of flood water has taken its toll.

Going solar in rural Mozambique

One successful project focused on promoting the use of solar energy for lighting and charging mobile phones.

Thanks to the lanterns, the local families now have lighting at night so that children can do their homework and adults their household chores even after nightfall. The extra lighting also allows for literacy classes and various income-generating activities to take place in the evening.

Help rebuild Mozambique

ADPP Mozambique and Take 10 Volunteers work with local project leaders in rural communities.

Many people are small scale farmers who are directly dependent on each year’s crops for survival. The projects work not only to adapt and mitigate climate change, but also to improve livelihoods in a sustainable way. The long-term aim is to bring about social and economic progress.