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 Living & working together as a team

“Alone, we can do so little; together, we can do so much” – Helen Keller

The training to become an international development instructor takes place at learning centres in Denmark, the UK and Norway: DRH Lindersvold (in Denmark), College for International Cooperation and Development (in the UK) and One World Institute (in Norway).

All of them are non-traditional boarding schools where students, teachers, volunteers and other residents study, travel, work, do sports, cook, arrange events and share life in general together for the duration of the programme.

Typically, the people at the learning centres come from all over Europe, and from countries where citizens have the possibility to get a visa to stay in Europe for three months.

Thus, you will find a great mix of people at the learning centres who are there for different reasons, but who share values like working together, international solidarity, community building, travelling with purpose and generally having a good time!

The learning centres can be described as intentional communities with an educational twist if you like. Due to the mix of cultures and nationalities and the keen interest in development work, planet protection, diversity and a holistic approach to how to create positive change, the learning centres have developed their own unique lifestyles.

What is “community life” in practice?

Community life means living together t a large campus with many possibilities and responsibilities. Everybody will contribute to making daily life function at the learning centre. It could be sharing daily tasks like cooking, cleaning, gardening, sorting the trash, baking bread or fixing that broken door handle.

It also means doing other things together; like studies of history and social science, discussing a documentary, playing volleyball, going for a walk in the surrounding (the beach or in the mountains, depending on the location of the learning centre) or arranging events.

It also means doing other things together; like studies of history and social science, discussing a documentary, playing volleyball, going for a walk in the surrounding (the beach or in the mountains, depending on the location of the learning centre) or arranging events.

Being part of the process

As an international development instructor, you need to develop a special skill which is to assume responsibility. This means that you need to be able to think and act beyond your own nose tip. So, apart from taking responsibility for your own person and your actions, you need to reach beyond your own needs and wishes and develop a keen ear and understanding of what the needs of the surrounding community are.

As a member of a team that will do things together, you will practice this through practical actions at the campus. It could be clearing out and refurbishing a classroom, polishing the windows or deep clean the kitchen after a weekend where you have had a lot of guests, or organise a cultural evening where you also invite your neighbours.

Someone must take the initiative to make bigger things like this happen and it does take some effort to get it done. Everyone gets to practice participating in such practical actions, discover how much you can achieve when you do things together – and realise the power of community.

Deciding things together

Once a week there is a common meeting where problems are discussed and solved, things like “how can we reduce food waste?” or “can someone help me with looking after the chickens next week” or “how can we avoid that the tools go missing from the workshop?”

The learning centres are inclusive, diverse communities that are working towards sustainability with all the challenges this ambition presents. It means that you, as a member of the community, need to take an active part in the process. We need to agree on how to do things, and who is in the lead of the different processes. When there are problems, we need to talk about it and figure out how to solve them – together.

Making it work

New initiatives are introduced and decided upon in common. However, it takes an effort to make it work in the beginning. Persistence, patience and willingness to look for solutions instead of complaining about is something we all must work on.

Communication is key. It is important that you speak up and address issues you are unhappy with. This can be done with respect and without offending anyone on purpose. Keeping your eyes on the issue at hand instead of expressing frustration about the people involved is usually a good way to move forward.

The leadership and teachers at the learning centres are experienced in leading the process to solve conflicts and issues when they arise.
If you are interested in learning more about our communal lifestyle or our international development volunteer programmes, please let us know!

A structured gap year can be just what you need.
A structured gap year can be just what you need.

Due to the mix of cultures and nationalities and the keen interest in development work, planet protection, diversity and a holistic approach to how to create positive change, the learning centres have developed their own unique lifestyles

What is the Take 10 Volunteer programme?

It is an action-based, fast-paced international development volunteer programme where volunteers receive relevant training for three months at a community-based learning centre in Europe.

Thereafter, volunteers participate actively and constructively in creating positive change in marginalised communities in Malawi, Mozambique, Zambia or India for six months.

The international development programme provides an opportunity for people from the global West and North to learn from, and volunteer with, community-driven projects under the Humana People to People umbrella. The projects respond to needs within the spheres of education, sustainable farming, child aid and mitigation of climate change.

The Humana People to People Movement has four decades of experience and comprises 32 national associations working in 43 countries worldwide, reaching approx. 16 million people in over 1.000 development projects.

What skills can I develop as a Take 10 Volunteer?

Through the different periods and elements of the programme you have the possibility to develop the following skills:

  • Written & Verbal Communication
  • Interpersonal Skills
  • Leadership
  • Self-Reflection
  • Confidence
  • Public Speaking
  • Decision Making
  • Investigative Research
  • Proactive Problem Solving
  • Project Management
Bracing for the pandemic

Bracing for the pandemic

With the epicentre of the COVID-19 crisis quickly moving, Africa and India are preparing for the outbreak to hit them hard. Their response is decisive for the entire world.

Colonialism & the Climate Crisis

Colonialism & the Climate Crisis

Many, if not all, of the modern-day issues are connected. The devastating climate crisis has its roots in the colonialism age, for example.

Preparation is key

Preparation is key

Examining your role as an international volunteer is important. Getting into listening & learning mode requires discussion & specialised training.

Social Justice vs Inequality

Social Justice vs Inequality

Equality is the backbone of social justice. Some organizations are working on closing the injustice gap in a sustainable approach – a good example to follow

A Sanctuary for Street Children

A Sanctuary for Street Children

DAPP Zambia’s Children’s Town project assists in the rehabilitation of former street children and other young people in need of a secure base and vocational training.

Living & working together

“Alone, we can do so little; together, we can do so much” – Helen Keller

The training to become an international development instructor takes place at learning centres in Denmark, the UK and Norway: DRH Lindersvold (in Denmark), College for International Cooperation and Development (in the UK) and One World Institute (in Norway).

A structured gap year can be just what you need.

All of them are non-traditional boarding schools where students, teachers, volunteers and other residents study, travel, work, do sports, cook, arrange events and share life in general together for the duration of the programme.

A structured gap year can be just what you need.

Typically, the people at the learning centres come from all over Europe, and from countries where citizens have the possibility to get a visa to stay in Europe for three months.

Thus, you will find a great mix of people at the learning centres who are there for different reasons, but who share values like working together, international solidarity, community building, travelling with purpose and generally having a good time!

A structured gap year can be just what you need.

The learning centres can be described as intentional communities with an educational twist if you like. Due to the mix of cultures and nationalities and the keen interest in development work, planet protection, diversity and a holistic approach to how to create positive change, the learning centres have developed their own unique lifestyles.

What is “community life” in practice?

Community life means living together t a large campus with many possibilities and responsibilities. Everybody will contribute to making daily life function at the learning centre. It could be sharing daily tasks like cooking, cleaning, gardening, sorting the trash, baking bread or fixing that broken door handle.

What skills can I develop as an International Development Volunteer?

Through the different periods and elements of the programme you have the possibility to develop the following skills:

  • Written & Verbal Communication
  • Interpersonal Skills
  • Leadership 
  • Self-Reflection
  • Confidence
  • Public Speaking
  • Decision Making
  • Investigative Research
  • Proactive Problem Solving
  • Project Management

It also means doing other things together; like studies of history and social science, discussing a documentary, playing volleyball, going for a walk in the surrounding (the beach or in the mountains, depending on the location of the learning centre) or arranging events.

Due to the mix of cultures and nationalities and the keen interest in development work, planet protection, diversity and a holistic approach to how to create positive change, the learning centres have developed their own unique lifestyles

It also means doing other things together; like studies of history and social science, discussing a documentary, playing volleyball, going for a walk in the surrounding (the beach or in the mountains, depending on the location of the learning centre) or arranging events.

Be part of the process

As an international development instructor, you need to develop a special skill which is to assume responsibility. This means that you need to be able to think and act beyond your own nose tip. So, apart from taking responsibility for your own person and your actions, you need to reach beyond your own needs and wishes and develop a keen ear and understanding of what the needs of the surrounding community are.

As a member of a team that will do things together, you will practice this through practical actions at the campus. It could be clearing out and refurbishing a classroom, polishing the windows or deep clean the kitchen after a weekend where you have had a lot of guests, or organise a cultural evening where you also invite your neighbours.

Someone must take the initiative to make bigger things like this happen and it does take some effort to get it done. Everyone gets to practice participating in such practical actions, discover how much you can achieve when you do things together – and realise the power of community.

Deciding things together

Once a week there is a common meeting where problems are discussed and solved, things like “how can we reduce food waste?” or “can someone help me with looking after the chickens next week” or “how can we avoid that the tools go missing from the workshop?”

The learning centres are inclusive, diverse communities that are working towards sustainability with all the challenges this ambition presents. It means that you, as a member of the community, need to take an active part in the process. We need to agree on how to do things, and who is in the lead of the different processes. When there are problems, we need to talk about it and figure out how to solve them – together.

Making it work

New initiatives are introduced and decided upon in common. However, it takes an effort to make it work in the beginning. Persistence, patience and willingness to look for solutions instead of complaining about is something we all must work on.

Communication is key. It is important that you speak up and address issues you are unhappy with. This can be done with respect and without offending anyone on purpose. Keeping your eyes on the issue at hand instead of expressing frustration about the people involved is usually a good way to move forward.

The leadership and teachers at the learning centres are experienced in leading the process to solve conflicts and issues when they arise.
If you are interested in learning more about our communal lifestyle or our international development volunteer programmes, please let us know!

What does it take to become a Take 10 Volunteer?

In order to enrol in the 10 month International Development Volunteer programme, you need to meet the following requirements:

    • You are 18 years old or older.
    • You are ready to leave your home for 10 months to volunteer in a community environment 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
    • You have decided not to drink alcohol or take drugs for the entirety of the program.
    • You are eager to experience a multidisciplinary and collective training programme, which includes theoretical and practical activities.
    • You are ready to immerse yourself in a multicultural and diverse community.
    • You are ready to volunteer where you are most needed.
    • You look forward to engaging with the Humana People to People projects in a spirit of cooperation, mutual learning and respect.
    • You are committed to learn about people, cultures, values and traditions, and to share your knowledge and stories with the public after your travels.

Take 10 Gap Year structure

3 months:
Preparation – training, practical skills, teamwork, setting goals

6 months:
Project work – in Malawi, Zambia, Mozambique or India

1 month:
Conclusion and information activities – reflection, bringing the good message out