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 #EndPoverty #Together

One billion people are living on less than US$2 per day. Three billion people earn less than US$8 per day.*
Thus, more than half of the world’s population live in poverty.

 

Poverty cannot be overcome by charity. It has to be resolved by changing an unjust system from the bottom up. 

*Numbers and model from Gapminder.

Children have rights

Every child has the right to a standard of living and a proper physical, mental, moral, and social environment for development. However, poverty is affecting children’s lives and lead to poor conditions in many sectors including health and education which are essential for the development of children.

 

Gender equality is key

The poor conditions that children suffer projects into adulthood leading to irreversible effects. Especially girls are affected by poverty. Every two seconds a girl is married off somewhere in the world, meaning that they will not be educated, will have children too early – and so the poverty spiral continues.

Thus, the need for gender equality is part of the equation to break the poverty trap.

 

What can be done?

Inclusive action and respect, building sustainable solutions, and working WITH the people have all been highlighted themes which helped achieve progress and fight poverty.

Poverty has been damaging economies and restricting the potential of millions of people for a long time. During the past years, the International Day has been raising awareness and promoting action in different aspects concerning the issue.

This year the focus is put on the right of every child to have a standard of living and a proper physical, mental, moral, and social environment for development.

A lot is being done to raise awareness on the importance of children’s rights and ending poverty and it is done for a reason. The need for equal rights and conditions for boys and girls was further emphasized on the International Day of The Girl Child.

One example

Humana People to People India (HPPI) is one organization that works consistently to improve the quality of education and eradicating poverty. The focus is put on the need for inclusive and equitable learning as well as scaling up adult literacy.

The impact of empowered education is tightly connected to increased health and environment awareness, psycho-social support, and parenting skills. HPPI hopes that by giving quality education to children they will grow to break the cycle of poverty, gender inequality, and mistreatment.

The organization has also dedicated several projects to supporting women’s education. Giving women access to possibilities and knowledge which will help them inspire others and support the economy shoulder to shoulder with men is a huge step forward in resolving the issue. Working together, shoulder to shoulder, communities will stand together to improve their conditions.

International solidarity

Too often the poverty is still seen as a result of people’s own inabilities and that they are to blame for their own shortage of resources. However, it is clear that  marginalised communites are able to act to improve their own situation, given the opportunity to do so. They are the experts in what needs to be done and are able to identify the solutions. 

But the efforts of the people themselves cannot stand alone. The international community need to do their part.Rights-based systemic changes need to be put in place for all people to live with dignity and equality. At the macro level, socially-just global trade systems and international labour rights laws are also of essence – this is what we can demand of our politicians to work for

 

What can individuals do?

We can show solidarity with marginalised communities in a number of ways:

  1. We can donate money to reputable organisations or directly to projects we have a personal connection to. We do like to know that our money is going for a good cause.

  2. Instead of sending our used clothes to a landfill, we can donate them to organisations that reuse and recycle textiles to generate funds for development aid projects.

  3. We can take an active interest in poverty and solidarity issues and learn and teach about  them. Familiarising yourself witht he Sustainable Development Goals is a great way yo get started.

  4. We can call for our local politicians and national politicians to take decisive action to promote equality and system changes.

  5. We can pursue studies and careers in international development or humanitarian work.

  6. We can volunteer in our local communities to support struggling individuals or communites.

  7. We can go abroad to volunteer responsibly with NGOs that implement community-based poverty reduction projects.

  8. We can spread awareness about all of the above. On social media you can use the hashtag #EndPoverty

The theme for the International Day for the Eradicating of Poverty in 2019 is:

“Acting together to empower children, their families and communities to end poverty”

 

A structured gap year can be just what you need.

One billion people are living on less than US$2 per day. Three billion people earn less than US$8 per day.*
Thus, more than half of the world’s population live in poverty.

Poverty cannot be overcome by charity. It has to be resolved by changing an unjust system from the bottom up. 

*model and numbers from Gapminder.

Children have rights

Every child has the right to a standard of living and a proper physical, mental, moral, and social environment for development. However, poverty is affecting children’s lives and lead to poor conditions in many sectors including health and education which are essential for the development of children.

 

A structured gap year can be just what you need.

Gender equality is key

The poor conditions that children suffer projects into adulthood leading to irreversible effects. Especially girls are affected by poverty. Every two seconds a girl is married off somewhere in the world, meaning that they will not be educated, will have children too early – and so the poverty spiral continues.

Thus, the need for gender equality is part of the equation to break the poverty trap.

A structured gap year can be just what you need.

What can be done?

Inclusive action and respect, building sustainable solutions, and working WITH the people have all been highlighted themes which helped achieve progress and fight poverty.

Poverty has been damaging economies and restricting the potential of millions of people for a long time. During the past years, the International Day has been raising awareness and promoting action in different aspects concerning the issue.

A structured gap year can be just what you need.

This year the focus is put on the right of every child to have a standard of living and a proper physical, mental, moral, and social environment for development.

A lot is being done to raise awareness on the importance of children’s rights and ending poverty and it is done for a reason. The need for equal rights and conditions for boys and girls was further emphasized on the International Day of The Girl Child.

A structured gap year can be just what you need.

One example

Humana People to People India (HPPI) is one organization that works consistently to improve the quality of education and eradicating poverty. The focus is put on the need for inclusive and equitable learning as well as scaling up adult literacy.

The impact of empowered education is tightly connected to increased health and environment awareness, psycho-social support, and parenting skills. HPPI hopes that by giving quality education to children they will grow to break the cycle of poverty, gender inequality, and mistreatment.

A structured gap year can be just what you need.

The organization has also dedicated several projects to supporting women’s education. Giving women access to possibilities and knowledge which will help them inspire others and support the economy shoulder to shoulder with men is a huge step forward in resolving the issue. Working together, shoulder to shoulder, communities will stand together to improve their conditions.

Video about Nai Disha literacy programme by HPP India

International solidarity

Too often the poverty is still seen as a result of people’s own inabilities and that they are to blame for their own shortage of resources. However, it is clear that  marginalised communites are able to act to improve their own situation, given the opportunity to do so. They are the experts in what needs to be done and are able to identify the solutions. 

But the efforts of the people themselves cannot stand alone. The international community need to do their part. Rights-based systemic changes need to be put in place for all people to live with dignity and equality. At the macro level, socially-just global trade systems and international labour rights laws are also of essence – this is what we can demand of our politicians to work for

 

A structured gap year can be just what you need.

What can individuals do?

We can show solidarity with marginalised communities in a number of ways:

 

  1. We can donate money to reputable organisations or directly to projects we have a personal connection to. We do like to know that our money is going for a good cause.

  2. Instead of sending our used clothes to a landfill, we can donate them to organisations that reuse and recycle textiles to generate funds for development aid projects.

  3. We can take an active interest in poverty and solidarity issues and learn and teach about  them. Familiarising yourself witht he Sustainable Development Goals is a great way yo get started.

  4. We can call for our local politicians and national politicians to take decisive action to promote equality and system changes.

  5. We can pursue studies and careers in international development or humanitarian work.

  6. We can volunteer in our local communities to support struggling individuals or communites.

  7. We can go abroad to volunteer responsibly with NGOs that implement community-based poverty reduction projects.

  8. We can spread awareness about all of the above. On social media you can use the hashtag #EndPoverty

The theme for the International Day for the Eradicating of Poverty in 2019 is:

“Acting together to empower children, their families and communities to end poverty”

 

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