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 Empowering Rural Women

Rural women in Africa and Asia work just as hard as their male counterparts to secure their families’ livelihoods. Women contribute with their labour and knowledge of agricultural practices and biodiversity on family farms – and they are good at it.

Feeding families & nations

Efforts of rural women are starting to get recognized in recent years but this doesn’t mean poverty and socio-political issues have disappeared. Rural areas are generally more affected by negative factors than urban ones.

Rural regions are responsible for nearly 80% of the food production in Asia and Africa. A big part of those results comes from the efforts of women who constitute 50% of the workforce in certain parts of Africa and Asia.

From ensuring sustainability in households to improving overall well-being women account for an impressive amount of the workforce in many sectors

Equal work, equal rights?

Despite the growing recognition of rural women’s contributions, there are still inequalities in many sectors. For example, women farmers are often more productive than their male counterparts, however, they are way less likely to get access to land, credits, tools, and data input.

Many rural areas have barriers and lingering discriminatory social norms constraining women’s decision making and political activity. The potential of many is lost due to the outdated belief that women are only suited for certain areas of work and social positions.

Not to mention some parts of the world restrict women’s access to education and public services and keeps most of their labour invisible and unpaid. Exclusion and poverty for rural women are statistically higher compared to rural men and urban women.

Adding up the impact of politics, climate change, and natural resources availability the issues can easily get out of hand unless the public decides to address it.

An added challenge: Climate Resilience

This year’s theme for the International Day of Rural Women is Rural Women and Girls Building Climate Resilience

The theme highlights the critical need to address climate change before it gets too late and puts emphasis on the important role of rural women and girls in the fight. Globally, one in every three women or girls is employed in the agriculture sector and secure water and food collection for rural households.

Addressing gender inequality is one of the easiest and most secure ways of achieving progress with the threats climate change is presenting. Undervalued women who are denied the possibility to showcase and develop their potential might as well be what we need to finally make a step forward. Empowered women have a great but underappreciated capacity. It is time to change that.

What is being done?

Organizations, individuals, and social groups are putting in the effort to fight climate change and gender inequality around the world.

DAPP Malawi and ADPP Mozambique are some of the organizations which have dedicated special programmes to empowering rural women.

DAPP Malawi unites the cause with promoting cooperation between men and women on equal terms with the goal to eradicate poverty and hunger.

ADPP Mozambique has committed to women empowerment for years and their ongoing activities are showing results. Women take leading roles in over 64 projects organized by ADPPM including educating young girls, fighting early marriage, women’s rights, and women entrepreneurship projects.

Girls Inspired Project in Mozambique

One such project is “Girls Inspire” – combating early and forced marriage and bringing down barriers preventing females from participating fully in society. The project is improving the livelihoods of rural women and providing them with the knowledge and tools which will enable them to enter the labour market or create their own income-generating activities.

ADDP Mozambique also utilizes other projects aiming to keep girls in school and provide a gender-equal environment in the classrooms.

 

 

 

A structured gap year can be just what you need.

The International Day of Rural Women

is marked for the 11th consecutive year on 15 October 2019. The aim of the marking this day is to raise awareness and educate people on the importance of rural women and how crucial their efforts in various sectors are for our development.

A structured gap year can be just what you need.

Rural women in Africa and Asia work just as hard as their male counterparts to secure their families’ livelihoods. Women contribute with their labour and knowledge of agricultural practices and biodiversity on family farms – and they are good at it.

The International Day of Rural Women

is marked for the 11th consecutive year on 15 October 2019. The aim of the marking this day is to raise awareness and educate people on the importance of rural women and how crucial their efforts in various sectors are for our development.

Feeding families & nations

Efforts of rural women are starting to get recognized in recent years but this doesn’t mean poverty and socio-political issues have disappeared. Rural areas are generally more affected by negative factors than urban ones.

Rural regions are responsible for nearly 80% of the food production in Asia and Africa. A big part of those results comes from the efforts of women who constitute 50% of the workforce in certain parts of Africa and Asia.

From ensuring sustainability in households to improving overall well-being women account for an impressive amount of the workforce in many sectors

A structured gap year can be just what you need.

Equal work, equal rights?

Despite the growing recognition of rural women’s contributions, there are still inequalities in many sectors. For example, women farmers are often more productive than their male counterparts, however, they are way less likely to get access to land, credits, tools, and data input.

Many rural areas have barriers and lingering discriminatory social norms constraining women’s decision making and political activity. The potential of many is lost due to the outdated belief that women are only suited for certain areas of work and social positions.

Not to mention some parts of the world restrict women’s access to education and public services and keeps most of their labour invisible and unpaid. Exclusion and poverty for rural women are statistically higher compared to rural men and urban women.

Adding up the impact of politics, climate change, and natural resources availability the issues can easily get out of hand unless the public decides to address it.

A structured gap year can be just what you need.

An added challenge: Climate Resilience

This year’s theme for the International Day of Rural Women is Rural Women and Girls Building Climate Resilience

The theme highlights the critical need to address climate change before it gets too late and puts emphasis on the important role of rural women and girls in the fight. Globally, one in every three women or girls is employed in the agriculture sector and secure water and food collection for rural households.

Addressing gender inequality is one of the easiest and most secure ways of achieving progress with the threats climate change is presenting. Undervalued women who are denied the possibility to showcase and develop their potential might as well be what we need to finally make a step forward. Empowered women have a great but underappreciated capacity. It is time to change that.

A structured gap year can be just what you need.

What is being done?

Organizations, individuals, and social groups are putting in the effort to fight climate change and gender inequality around the world.

DAPP Malawi and ADPP Mozambique are some of the organizations which have dedicated special programmes to empowering rural women.

DAPP Malawi unites the cause with promoting cooperation between men and women on equal terms with the goal to eradicate poverty and hunger.

 

A structured gap year can be just what you need.

ADPP Mozambique has committed to women empowerment for years and their ongoing activities are showing results. Women take leading roles in over 64 projects organized by ADPPM including educating young girls, fighting early marriage, women’s rights, and women entrepreneurship projects.

 

A structured gap year can be just what you need.

Girls Inspired Project in Mozambique

One such project is “Girls Inspire” – combating early and forced marriage and bringing down barriers preventing females from participating fully in society. The project is improving the livelihoods of rural women and providing them with the knowledge and tools which will enable them to enter the labour market or create their own income-generating activities.

ADDP Mozambique also utilizes other projects aiming to keep girls in school and provide a gender-equal environment in the classrooms.

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